Santa Maria in Cosmedin: A Roman Water Fountain Worth Visiting

Archaeologists and restorers alike have stumbled upon a wealth of pagan and Christian artifacts on the site of Santa Maria in Cosmedin in Rome. The well-known marble sculpture known as the Bocca della Verità (Mouth of Truth) is located in the portico of the basilica nearby. ft-103__58249.jpg Built in 1719, the Santa Maria in Cosmedin water fountain was not well known and located far from sight making it difficult to visit. Since the nearby area was gloomy and mostly uninhabited, visitors were not particularly interested in visiting it. It was a this time that Pope Clement XI commissioned the Italian architect Carlo Bizzaccheri to put up a water fountain to modernize the square outside the church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin. The job of laying down the church’s first stones started on August 17, 1717. The first stone to be placed in the foundation was consecrated and medals bearing the illustrations of the Blessed Virgin, for whom the church is named, and St. John the Baptist, the patron saint of water, were also thrown in.

How to Select the Most Suitable Place for Your Water Fountain

Before picking out a water fountain, take some time to think about precisely where you want to put it. Roundabouts and driveways are ideal spots for them.

If you choose to put yours against a wall, there are fountains designed specifically for this purpose. If you look on the back, you will notice a bar or some other piece to affix it against a wall, grate or fence. Bare in mind when you put up your fountain that you must firmly affix it to a wall to avoid having it fall over in high winds and getting damaged.

A popular spot to add a garden sculpture is mainly in areas where people gather to sit back and enjoy the scenery.

Putting in a Wall Water Feature in Your Residence

Make any room much better with a wall fountain. A waterfall will bring a feeling of relaxation with the comforting sounds of trickling water. Entryways are common places for wall fountains, but they can also be hung in any common area. How to install one varies a bit depending on the model, but there are some general directions that apply to all of them. Note that different pieces will need to be put together during assembly. First you should attach the foundation to the upper portion, then connect the pump and the tubing. Remember to review the directions before getting started in order to avert errors. It is usually a straight-forward process. Keep in mind, though, that each model might require a slight adjustment. Have a colleague hold the wall fountain in the desired place, then mark the wall accordingly. To ensure a straight line, use a level. It is advisable to mark both the bottom and the top placements. Wall features can be hung in more than one way. You can place the screws in the wall and glide them into the holes on the back of the wall fountain. Another option is to place it on brackets you have secured to the wall. This alternative tends to be recommended for big wall fountains. Determine where the brackets need to be placed and mark the wall accordingly. To place the drywall anchors, first drill pilot holes into the wall. Attentively hammer the anchors into the wall. Attach the brackets by ensuring they are straight and then screwing them into the wall with a drill or screwdriver.

At this point, hoist your unit and hang it on the mounting brackets. Check to see that it is in the ideal position and safely on the brackets. If the positioning is acceptable, it’s time to add water. Use sufficient water so that the pump is entirely covered. The water will begin to circulate as soon as you plug in your fountain. The water should fill the basin to within one inch of the top. Be careful not to fill it completely to the top or it will overflow when you turn off the pump. The water level will rise because all of the moving water will settle down at the bottom part of the basin. When the fountain is overly full, water can spill out and cause damage to the immediate area.

Aqueducts: The Solution to Rome's Water Challenges

Aqua Anio Vetus, the first raised aqueduct assembled in Rome, started out delivering the individuals living in the hills with water in 273 BC, though they had counted on natural springs up till then. Outside of these aqueducts and springs, wells and rainwater-collecting cisterns were the lone technological innovations around at the time to supply water to spots of high elevation. In the very early 16th century, the city began to use the water that flowed below ground through Acqua Vergine to provide drinking water to Pincian Hill. The aqueduct’s channel was made reachable by pozzi, or manholes, that were placed along its length when it was initially constructed. The manholes made it less demanding to thoroughly clean the channel, but it was also possible to use buckets to extract water from the aqueduct, as we witnessed with Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi when he operated the property from 1543 to 1552, the year he passed away. Although the cardinal also had a cistern to amass rainwater, it didn’t provide a sufficient amount of water. By using an opening to the aqueduct that ran underneath his property, he was set to meet his water demands.

The Many Ways You Can Benefit from Fountains

There are numerous benefits to be gained from outdoor fountains including improved air quality as well as wonderful sounds and sights. They will make you happier, healthier and give you a beautiful place to gather with people you care about. That said, once you put in your fountain you will likely take note of the many benefits it gives only you. Perhaps it takes you back to a certain area you once visited. It might just make you think back to a special person from your past. Or perhaps you want to build one to remind you of someone you have lost. You will undoubtedly appreciate its benefits and elegance for a long time.


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