Contemporary Garden Decoration: Large Outdoor Water Fountains and their Roots

A water fountain is an architectural piece that pours water into a basin or jets it high into the air in order to provide drinkable water, as well as for decorative purposes.

Originally, fountains only served a functional purpose. Cities, towns and villages made use of nearby aqueducts or springs to supply them with potable water as well as water where they could bathe or wash. 8352_3503__07687.jpg Until the late nineteenth, century most water fountains operated using gravity to allow water to flow or jet into the air, therefore, they needed a supply of water such as a reservoir or aqueduct located higher than the fountain. Fountains were not only utilized as a water source for drinking water, but also to adorn homes and celebrate the designer who created it. Animals or heroes made of bronze or stone masks were often utilized by Romans to beautify their fountains. Muslims and Moorish landscaping designers of the Middle Ages included fountains to re-create smaller versions of the gardens of paradise. King Louis XIV of France wanted to demonstrate his dominion over nature by including fountains in the Gardens of Versailles. The Popes of the 17th and 18th centuries were glorified with baroque style fountains made to mark the place of entry of Roman aqueducts.

The end of the nineteenth century saw the rise in usage of indoor plumbing to provide drinking water, so urban fountains were relegated to strictly decorative elements. The creation of special water effects and the recycling of water were two things made possible by swapping gravity with mechanical pumps.

Modern-day fountains function mostly as decoration for open spaces, to honor individuals or events, and compliment entertainment and recreational events.

Aqueducts: The Solution to Rome's Water Problems

Prior to 273, when the 1st elevated aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was constructed in Roma, citizens who dwelled on hills had to journey further down to get their water from natural sources. If citizens living at higher elevations did not have access to springs or the aqueduct, they’d have to depend on the other existing technologies of the day, cisterns that compiled rainwater from the sky and subterranean wells that drew the water from below ground. Beginning in the sixteenth century, a newer approach was introduced, using Acqua Vergine’s subterranean portions to generate water to Pincian Hill. Spanning the length of the aqueduct’s channel were pozzi, or manholes, that gave access. During the roughly 9 years he owned the residence, from 1543 to 1552, Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi employed these manholes to take water from the network in containers, though they were previously established for the intent of maintaining and maintaining the aqueduct. It seems that, the rainwater cistern on his property wasn’t good enough to meet his needs. To provide himself with a more effective way to assemble water, he had one of the manholes opened up, offering him access to the aqueduct below his residence.

The Godfather Of Rome's Water Fountains

There are numerous celebrated water features in the city center of Rome. Gian Lorenzo Bernini, one of the greatest sculptors and artists of the 17th century planned, conceived and produced nearly all of them. He was furthermore a city designer, in addition to his abilities as a fountain engineer, and records of his life's work are evident all through the avenues of Rome.

A renowned Florentine sculptor, Bernini's father mentored his young son, and they eventually transferred to Rome to thoroughly express their artwork, chiefly in the form of public water features and water fountains. The young Bernini received compliments from Popes and relevant artists alike, and was an excellent employee. His sculpture was originally his claim to fame. Working effortlessly with Roman marble, he utilized a base of experience in the classic Greek architecture, most famously in the Vatican. Though a variety of artists impacted his artistic endeavors, Michelangelo inspired him the most.

Introduce the Power of Feng Shui into Your Yard

When applied to your yard, feng shui design will introduce its healthy energy into your home as well.

Do not be concerned if your garden is considered too little for feng shui design, as size is is not especially relevant. A huge area is great for those privileged enough to have it, but a smaller area can still be useful in feng shui design.

Whether you are bringing feng shui design to your home or garden, the tools are the same. Your yard's bagua, or energy map, is an off-shoot of your home’s bagua, so it is important to figure out your home’s first.

It is also important to know the five elements in the theory of feng shui and how best to use each one to make the most of its energy.

The northeast corner of your garden, for instance, connects to personal growth and self-cultivation energy, and Earth is the feng shui element that is essential to integrate it. A Zen garden with some nice natural rocks is perfect for that spot, as the rocks represent the Earth element.

People thinking about incorporating a water element into their garden should place it in one of these feng shui areas: North (career & path in life), Southeast (money and abundance), or East (health & family).

Use a Wall Water Fountain To Help Improve Air Quality

An otherwise boring ambiance can be pepped up with an indoor wall fountain. Your senses and your wellness can benefit from the installation of one of these indoor features. The science behind the idea that water fountains can be beneficial for you is unquestionable. The negative ions released by water features are countered by the positive ions emitted by present-day conveniences. When positive ions overtake negative ones, this results in improved mental and physical health. They also raise serotonin levels, so you start to feel more alert, relaxed and invigorated. The negative ions generated by indoor wall fountains foster a better mood as well as remove air impurities from your home. They also help to eliminate allergies, contaminants as well as other types of irritants. And finally, water fountains are excellent at absorbing dust and microbes floating in the air and as a result in bettering your overall health.


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