Commonplace Water Elements Found in Japanese Gardens

A water element is an essential part of any Japanese garden. They tend to be placed right at the entrance of Japanese temples and homes because they are regarded as being representative of spiritual and physical cleansing. Since water is the most essential element of any Japanese fountain, the design is normally simple. ft_151__48029.jpg

You will also find many fountains that have spouts built of bamboo. The bamboo spout is placed over the basin, typically constructed of natural rocks, and water trickles out. Even when new, it should be made to look as if it has been outside for a long time. People want their fountain to look as natural as possible, so they position plants, flowers, and stones around the fountain. Needless to say, this fountain is something more than just a simple decoration.

An alternative is to get a stone fountain, set it on a bed of rock, and place live bamboo and pretty stones around it. In time, as moss progressively covers the stones, it becomes even more natural-looking.

Anyone who has an extensive space to work with can, of course, out in a much larger water feature. Charming add-ons include a babbling brook or tiny pool with koi in it.

Water, however, does not have to be used in a Japanese fountain.

Potential alternatives include stones, gravel, or sand to represent water. The illusion of a creek with running water can also be achieved by putting flat stones very closely together.

What Water Features Add to Your Well-Being

Not only do outdoor fountains add beauty to any environment, they also provide pleasing sounds and cleaner air. Not only do they add style to your decor, they also create a great place to gather with family and friends, and offer a range of health benefits. Different people, however, notice that their fountain is important to them for many personal reasons. You could be reminded of a great vacation or trip you took. When you see it, you may flash back to a special someone you once knew. Or perhaps you want to get one in memory of someone you have lost. Whatever the case, it is something you will look fondly on for many years to come.

How Feng Shui Make Your Yard into A Good Place to Think

When applied to your yard, feng shui design will introduce its healthy energy into your home as well.

Do not worry if your yard is considered too small for feng shui design, as size is relatively unimportant. A huge space is great for those fortunate enough to have it, but a more compact area can still be useful in feng shui design.

The principal feng shui tools can be used for your interior decor as well as your garden design. The first task is to know the bagua, or energy map, of your home, as your garden’s bagua will be an extension of that.

In order to make the most of feng shui, it is crucial to start by knowing how to strengthen each of its five elements.

An example of this is that Earth is the feng shui element you should include in the northeast part of your garden because that part of your garden connects to the energy of personal growth and self-cultivation. This could be the perfect place to put a meditative Zen garden with some attractive stones because these represent the Earth element in feng shui.

Think about integrating a water feature into these feng shui areas: East (health & family), North (career & path in life), or Southeast (money and abundance).

Grow Your Enterprise with a Water Feature in Your Offices

Most customers love water fountains. If you have a business or store, having a water fountain will likely bring in more clients and differentiate you from the competition. Yoga studios, bookstores, coffee shops, salons, and other retail spaces are great places to install a water feature. For businesses where people like to hang out outdoors, a water fountain can provide a chilled environment. A bar or restaurant should contemplate adding a water fountain to bring in couples seeking a romantic setting.

Where are the Planet's Most Grandiose Water Features?

Located in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, the King Fahd Fountain (1985) is the highest continually-functioning fountain in the world. Attaining incredible heights above the Red Sea, this fountain propels water 260 meters (853 feet) in the sky.

Coming in second is the World Cup Fountain located in the Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002) with water shooting 202 meters (663 feet).

Occupying third place is the Gateway Geyser (1995), located close to the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri.

It rockets water 192 meters (630 feet) into the air and is currently the tallest fountain in the United States.

Next is Port Fountain (2006) in Karachi, Pakistan, where the water shoots 190 meters (620 feet) high.

Number 4 is Water at Fountain Park (1970) situated in Fountain Hills, Arizona - it can reach up to 171 meters (561 feet) when all three pumps are running, even though it normally only hits up to 91 meters (300 feet).

The Dubai Fountain opened in 2009 near to Burj Khalifa - the world's tallest building. It performs every 1/2 hour to previously recorded music and propels water up to 73 meters (240 feet) in height -it also has built in extreme shooters, though only used during special events, which reach 150 meters (490 feet) in height.

Jetting water up to 147 meters (482 feet) high, the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet (1970) in Canberra, Australia, comes in seventh.

And at #8, we have the the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951), measuring 140 meters (460 feet).


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