The Famous Revelation Waterworks at Chatsworth

Designed by well-known English sculptor Angela Conner, Revelation is the most recent addition to the Chatsworth decorative exterior fountains. In 2004/2005 she was commissioned by the now deceased 11th Duke of Devonshire to create a limited edition bust of Queen Elizabeth, in brass and steel, for the Queen’s 80th birthday celebration. be-135_art__20848.jpg “Revelation” was installed in 1999 in Jack Pond, one of Chatsworth’s earliest ponds. Alternatively camouflaging and revealing a gold colored globe at the sculpture’s center, the steel fountain takes on the shape of four large flower petals that open and close with the circulation of water. The sculpture’s dimensions are five meters high by five meters wide and includes a metallic globe painted with gold dust. The flower petals move based on the movement of water, making this installation an intriguing addition to the Gardens of Chatsworth.

From Where Did Fountains Originate from?

The incredible construction of a fountain allows it to provide clean water or shoot water high into air for dramatic effect and it can also serve as an excellent design feature to enhance your home.

Originally, fountains only served a practical purpose. Water fountains were linked to a spring or aqueduct to supply potable water as well as bathing water for cities, townships and villages. Until the late nineteenth, century most water fountains operated using the force of gravity to allow water to flow or jet into the air, therefore, they needed a supply of water such as a reservoir or aqueduct located higher than the fountain. Artists thought of fountains as wonderful additions to a living space, however, the fountains also served to supply clean water and honor the artist responsible for building it. The main materials used by the Romans to build their fountains were bronze or stone masks, mostly depicting animals or heroes. Throughout the Middle Ages, Muslim and Moorish garden planners incorporated fountains to create mini depictions of the gardens of paradise. The fountains found in the Gardens of Versailles were meant to show the power over nature held by King Louis XIV of France. Seventeen and 18 century Popes sought to laud their positions by adding decorative baroque-style fountains at the point where restored Roman aqueducts arrived into the city.

The end of the 19th century saw the rise in usage of indoor plumbing to provide drinking water, so urban fountains were relegated to strictly decorative elements. Fountains using mechanical pumps instead of gravity enabled fountains to bring recycled water into living spaces as well as create special water effects.

Beautifying city parks, honoring people or events and entertaining, are some of the uses of modern-day fountains.

Water Features: The Minoan Culture

During archaeological digs on the island of Crete, a variety of types of channels have been detected. They were used for water supply as well as removal of storm water and wastewater. Many were made from clay or even rock. There were clay pipelines, both circular and rectangle-shaped as well as waterways made from the same components. Among these were clay conduits which were U-shaped or a shorter, cone-like form which have exclusively showed up in Minoan culture. Knossos Palace had a state-of-the-art plumbing network made of clay pipes which ran up to three meters below ground. These Minoan conduits were also used for gathering and stocking water, not just distribution. In order to make this feasible, the piping had to be designed to handle: Underground Water Transportation: This concealed setup for water distribution could have been utilized to supply water to certain people or occasions. Quality Water Transportation: The water pipes could also have been chosen to haul water to fountains that were separate from the city’s normal technique.

The Original Garden Water Fountains

As initially conceived, fountains were crafted to be functional, directing water from creeks or aqueducts to the inhabitants of cities and settlements, where the water could be utilized for cooking, cleaning, and drinking. In the years before electric power, the spray of fountains was powered by gravity exclusively, usually using an aqueduct or water resource located far away in the surrounding hills. The splendor and spectacle of fountains make them ideal for historic memorials. If you saw the first fountains, you probably would not recognize them as fountains. A stone basin, crafted from rock, was the very first fountain, utilized for containing water for drinking and ceremonial purposes. Rock basins as fountains have been discovered from 2000 BC. The first civilizations that utilized fountains relied on gravity to drive water through spigots. The placement of the fountains was influenced by the water source, which is why you’ll commonly find them along reservoirs, waterways, or streams. The Romans began building decorative fountains in 6 BC, most of which were metallic or stone masks of wildlife and mythological representations. Water for the open fountains of Rome was brought to the city via a complex system of water aqueducts.

Water Features: A Must Have in any Japanese Landscapes

No Japanese garden is whole without a water element. They tend to be placed right at the entrance of Japanese temples and homes because they are thought to be representative of spiritual and physical cleansing. It is unusual to see extravagantly-designed Japanese fountains because the focus is supposed to be on the water itself.

Moreover, water fountains with bamboo spouts are very prevalent. The basin, which tends to be fashioned of stones, collects the water as it trickles down from the bamboo spout. Even when new, it should be crafted to look as if it has been outdoors for a long time. So that the fountain appears at one with nature, people normally decorate it with natural stones, pretty flowers, and plants. Obviously, this fountain is something more than just a regular decoration.

If you want to get a bit more imaginative, try a stone fountain decorated with live bamboo and other natural elements placed on a bed of gravel. Gradually moss begins to grow over the stones and cover them, and as that happens the area begins to look more and more like a natural part of the landscape.

More substantial water features can be developed if there is enough open land. Consider adding a beautiful final touch like a pond filled with koi or a tiny stream.

Japanese fountains, though, do not actually need to have water in them. Good options include stones, gravel, or sand to represent water.

You can also collect flat stones and place them close enough together that they look like water in motion.


Rome’s Ingenious Water Delivery Systems
Aqua Anio Vetus, the first raised aqueduct built in Rome, started supplying the individuals living in the hills with water in 273 BC, although they had depended on natural springs up until then. During this time period, there were only two other systems capable of... read more
A Short History of Public Garden Fountains
As originally developed, fountains were designed to be functional, guiding water from streams or reservoirs to the citizens of cities and settlements, where... read more
The One Cleaning Solution to NEVER Use On Your Garden Water fountains
One final tip for keeping your fountain in top working shape is to check the water level every day and make sure it is full. Permitting the water level to get too low can result in damage to the pump - and you certainly do not want that! read more